jump anyway


When the "hits" just keep on coming and you want to jump into your Father's arms, remember:

There's a great difference between trusting Him for what you want Him to do... 

and trusting Him for who He is. 

They do overlap, but He may spin you in a different direction as you embrace Him than what you planned for.

Jump anyway. He's your Father.
"O Lord, are our Father, our Redeemer from of old is your name." (Isaiah 63:16b)

rethinking our mission statements and values



Richard Branson is nothing short of a Type-B conundrum in the world of Type-A leadership gurus. I'm working through his book "The Virgin Way" right now. This quote caught my eye:
"Before anyone tries to come up with a mission statement... there is the little matter of actually considering your company's commitment and ability to live up to it. If neither of these conditions is present then there's no point in trying to 'put lipstick on the pig' by means of a fanciful, pie-in-the-sky mission statement."

What values in your life do you swear you hold to...

but your commitment and ability to follow through on them don't seem to be growing into those values?

If anyone says, “I love God,” and hates his brother, he is a liar; for he who does not love his brother whom he has seen cannot love God whom he has not seen.(1 John 4:20)

If anyone thinks he is religious and does not bridle his tongue but deceives his heart, this person's religion is worthless. (James 1:26)

What good is it, my brothers, if someone says he has faith but does not have works? Can that faith save him? If a brother or sister is poorly clothed and lacking in daily food, and one of you says to them, “Go in peace, be warmed and filled,” without giving them the things needed for the body, what good is that? So also faith by itself, if it does not have works, is dead. But someone will say, “You have faith and I have works.” Show me your faith apart from your works, and I will show you my faith by my works. (James 2:14-18)

why prayer matters right now


Prayer is one way to honest with your foundation, but also with your opposition.
 
It allows your circumstances to overlap with a larger story, and a larger Story to overlap with your circumstances.
"I know I am anchored, but the waves are thick today."
"And pray in the Spirit on all occasions with all kinds of prayers and requests. With this in mind, be alert and always keep on praying for all the Lord's people." (Ephesians 6:18)

the balance between confidence and humility

Captain “Sully” Sullenberger who successfully piloted Flight 1549 to safety in the Hudson River saved more than 150 passengers in the process. He exemplified a balance between confidence and humility as few could, attributing his courage through poise to his training over the years.
“One way of looking at this might be that for 42 years I’ve been making small, regular deposits in this bank of experience, education and training. And on January 15 the balance was sufficient so that I could make a very large withdrawal.”


The balance between confidence and humility... 

comes from being a rooted person who is faithful in the everyday moments.

"Whoever is faithful in very little is also faithful in much, and whoever is unfaithful in very little is also unfaithful in much." (Jesus, via Luke 16:10)

colored perspective

Every day. you and I take a risk.

We either risk something to be proactive and intentional, or we risk what it means to be reactive and passive. Each decision reflects this.

That's why I appreciate Richard Branson's metaphor on this:
It's like painting. You start with a blank canvas. You can paint anything – anything – and there, right there, is your first problem. For every good painting you might turn out, there are a zillion bad paintings just aching to drip off your brush. Scared? You should be.

You start.

You pick a colour. The next colour you choose has to work with the first colour. The third colour has to work with the first colour and the second. The fourth colour...

You get the idea. You're committed now. You absolutely cannot stop. You've invested. There is no reverse gear on this thing.
People who bad-mouth businessmen and women in general are missing the point. People in business who succeed have swallowed their fear and have set out to create something special, something to make a difference to people's lives. Are the colours just right? Are the planes polished? Do the crew look good? Are they comfortable? Are the seats OK? What's the food like? It costs how much...?

And whether you're a surrealist or a CEO, there are always bills to pay and money always arrives later than you ever dreamed possible. In the teeth of a downturn, petty financial hassles can turn into major, life-changing crises, and tough decisions often have to be made. This is the side of business that journalists like to write about – but it's the least exciting, least distinctive part of business. It's secondary. It's dull.

What really matters is what you create. Does it work or not? Does it make you proud?

- Richard Branson, Business Stripped Bare
Whatever opportunity God has invited you to seize, seize it. Be of courage. 

Start painting. The colored perspective you can offer the world just may be exactly what it needs.

"In the morning sow your seed, and at evening withhold not your hand, for you do not know which will prosper, this or that, or whether both alike will be good." (Ecclesiastes 11:6)


the danger of momentum



We all like momentum, but it is deceptive.
When you have momentum, it makes everything look better than it is.

When you don't have momentum, it makes everything look worse than it is.

- Andy Stanley

It's why one of your roles in any arena of momentum -

be it life, work or play -

is reminding people what reality is and isn't.

The best way?

Celebrate actual momentum when it happens.

And if it doesn't happen?

Point toward somewhere it is outside of your circle and humbly ask, "What can we learn from that?"

How?
"Let us fix our eyes on Jesus, the author and perfecter of faith" (Hebrews 12:2)

wild partnerships

Some things don't seem to belong together, but somehow end up together.

For example, did you know that you can now eat food at office stores?

Wild.

One of my friends happened to realize this.


I imagine the conversation there often goes something like this:
Guy #1: "I heard you have food. Can I get a chimichanga?"

Staples employee: (looks confused)

Guy #1: "How about Won Ton soup?"

Staples employee: (still confused)

Guy #2: "I'd like some milk, eggs and bread."

Staples employee: "Coming right up."

Guy #1: (looks at Guy #2, confused)

Guy #2: "Staples."
Wild.

God's wisdom in this world can likewise seem somewhat out of place.

We seek power and recognition.
God calls us to become servants.

We seek dominance in a professional field, recreational activity or relationships.
God calls us to cast aside our reputation to befriend those who are outcasts.

We seek happiness and satisfaction.
God calls us to holiness and sacrificial living.

And then there's God Himself who chooses to live among us as the "Sovereign, Savior and Spirit" Trinity. He could eliminate us, and yet He pursues justice and compassion. He could set creation into motion and abandon us, and yet He is intimately involved in everything. He could partner with the best of the best of the best, but invites the rest of the rest of the rest.

Wild... what a wild partnership.



How does that inspire you to relate or lead others today?
"Therefore if you have any encouragement from being united with Christ, if any comfort from his love, if any common sharing in the Spirit, if any tenderness and compassion, then make my joy complete by being like-minded, having the same love, being one in spirit and of one mind. Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit. Rather, in humility value others above yourselves, not looking to your own interests but each of you to the interests of the others. In your relationships with one another, have the same mindset as Christ Jesus:" (Philippians 2:1-5)

what success requires

Success is not an accident.
Success is a choice.

That's a powerful thought that's floating around.



Consider the example of Steph Curry:
"I’ve always been a believer that the Lord has put whatever talent in you, [and] whatever gift He has put in you, He wants you to get the most out of that. He wants you to succeed; He wants you to pursue and work and be passionate about it. It’s not about getting any of the glory for yourself; it’s all for His [glory]. That’s where you have to keep perspective. Work at it and do all you can so you get the most out of yourself, but do it for His will." - FCA interview


What are you doing with the opportunities in front of you?
"Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever." (1 Corinthians 9:25)

the remnant of pain

I have friends who hurt.

There are people close to me who hurt.

I see strangers who hurt.

I ache to give each person a word or a thought that will make this better, but I've come to realize that pain doesn't work that way. I'd even go so far as to say that even those who experience healing at a core level will probably remember this wound certain wounds the rest of their lives.

People who assume we can just move on from such a hit have probably never been hit that hard.

I do know, though, that life can get to the point where the pain doesn't define our day. It can be tough, because sometimes we are all afraid to "continue on" because it may seem to cheapen the loss.

I'm reminded of a man I once knew who served as a custodian in a church I was in. He was an older guy, and we'd chat about this or that. One day during the Halloween season he spontaneously told me about the way his son years ago happened to dress up like Charlie Chaplin. It felt like he was describing a ten-year old, and yet he shared it like it all happened yesterday.

So I asked a bit further about his son, since I'd never heard him mention him before. His face changed from a smile to am almost-controlled sob... almost. He shared that his son had died in Vietnam. Just like the Charlie Chaplin story, it seemed as if it had happened yesterday in how he told it.

Of course, he then moved on to his job and duties after that moment...

but that moment was there.

Sometimes that moment doesn't go away.

It is the remnant of pain.

And yet... it is not the end of the Story.
"For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worth comparing with the glory that is to be revealed to us." (Romans 8:18)

everybody

"Everybody's been saying..."

"A lot of people think..."

"I've heard many people who..."

A big mistake you can make in managing input is believing a handful of opinions is everybody's opinion.

And... remember...

everybody's opinion is not God's conclusion.

"For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways... for as the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways and my thoughts than your thoughts." (Isaiah 55:8-9)

we didn't start the fire... so what?

Blame is spelled "B-lame."

It's an escape mechanism we use to get out of awkward situations we should stay in and work through, like using a parachute to get out of a plane because we're afraid someone will hold us accountable for taking one too many bags of free pretzels.

What feels like a way out of one situation only makes matters worse and forms new situations.

 
This is especially true if we never get caught, for if we get away with our choices now we'll assume that will always be the case. One day we will stand before God in a final judgment over our lives, and we can't in that moment point fingers to blame others for our own choices.

Then again, we didn't start the fire.
"The man said, The woman you put here with me‑‑she gave me some fruit from the tree, and I ate it. Then the LORD God said to the woman, What is this you have done? The woman said, The serpent deceived me, and I ate." (Gen 3:12-13) 

Then again, not starting the fire doesn't mean we should keep letting it burn everyone.
"So then, each of us will give an account of himself to God. Therefore let us stop passing judgment on one another. Instead, make up your mind not to put any stumbling block or obstacle in your brother's way." (Romans 14:12-13)

doctoring up social media

True story:

I was at the doctor's check-in desk last week, sharing private info in a moderately quiet voice. I ended with, "Hey, one more question - where's the bathroom?"

A lady sitting behind me in the waiting room started loudly answering my question.

Social Media is kind of like that some days.

You have to choose to either lean into certain conversations you intended to have or embrace the audience around you and increase your engagement.

True story.
"To answer before listening - that is folly and shame." (Proverbs 18:13)

this is the life

How innocent it is to see what's before you as a great curtain, ready to unveil the next presentation before you.

This is the life.

Then...

How disheartening it is to start to see the curtain differently.... to notice its dust, rips and tears... to wonder if there ever was any genuine magic at all.

This is the life.

Then...

How redemptive it is to review it all, and review yourself... and then to not just see the seams, but to see the seams as yet another unveiling of the next presentation before you.

This is the life.
"For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known." (1 Corinthians 13:12)

how do you do it?

I spend a large part of my week connecting with various people inside and outside of my church. The one theme I keep running into is how maxed out so many of our lives are. 

How do you do it?

Whatever your role in life, you likely spent the last week doing one or more of the following:
  • Public Speaker: you had one or more situations where whatever you said was before an audience expecting you to say just the right thing in just the right way
  • Font of Wisdom: you were expected to know the answers… backward and forward... so someone feeling backward could go forward
  • Visionary: you felt the burden of keeping a keen eye on circumstances, culture and the horizon so you could tell others
  • Therapist: you listened to others share their problems, and you did this with actual empathy
  • Writer/Editor: you felt burdened to say something, yet wondered if you should - and if you should say it, how you should say it
  • Evangelist: you remembered Jesus' command to reach new people for Him and took a step to do so
  • Trainer: you shared your experience with others who were eager to learn
  • Disciplinarian: you confronted something/someone needing it in order to make things better
  • Iron Chef: you took whatever was in your cupboard and made a masterpiece out of it - even though not everyone else thought so
  • Cheerleader: you became someone's biggest fan, even if it meant looking foolish
  • Doctor: you tended to the wound of another person, be it a physical need or something intangible
  • Public Relations: you engaged the community at large somehow for something you believe in, be it personally or on social media
  • Prayer Warrior: you unleashed your heart to God and invited Him to unleash His heart into you
  • CEO: you hustled for the sake of "many" and yet stepped up so that the buck could stop with someone - "you"
  • Fundraiser: you looked at the numbers on hand so they could be best managed and multiplied
  • Special Events Coordinator: you managed a schedule for others so they could be appropriately be challenged, entertained and kept busy
  • Chauffeur: you got everyone where they needed to be while driving between the lines
  • Diplomat: you helped navigate change with the right words so people would keep the right focus
  • Janitor: you did the ugly work so people would have a clean perspective
  • Actor: you somehow pulled all of this off, not losing i

I can only imagine the thought of doing it all once, let alone again, is enough to send any of us under our covers not wanting to get out of bed.

How do you do it?
"And whatever you do, whether in word or deed, do it all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through Him." (Colossians 3:17)

a great gift and burden

One of our greatest gifts - 
and burdens - 

is when we realize that we're not here merely for ourselves, but for something greater... 

that who God is and what He has shared with us can either be shut up inside of us or shared with others and multiplied.

Feel inadequate in doing this? You are not alone.

Even greater a gift -
and burden -
is how your response can affect others.

You can either by example give others inspiration to jump in and seize their purpose as God intends, or give others permission for something lesser than that, too.

God has called us to be people of prayer...

to reach new people for Jesus...

to develop each other into maturity.

Perhaps you don't consciously reject that, but are you rejecting that with your actions?

Are you praying, reaching new people, and developing others?

And - how are your actions (or lack of them) an example?
"You are the salt of the earth, but if salt has lost its taste, how shall its saltiness be restored? It is no longer good for anything except to be thrown out and trampled under people's feet." (Matthew 5:13)

a sense of urgency

A sense of urgency.

I'm reminded today of how much we put off because we don't really feel the true weight of putting things off.

"I'll get to that eventually," we reason.

"They'll always be around for when I'm not so busy," we conclude.

"It's not that it isn't a priority, but..." we rationalize.

We are urgency killers.

Strangely enough, we say we value the chance to go on an adventure, grab new opportunities, leap over new hazards and find ways to win in what matters most.

In my circle over the past few weeks I've seen people near me lose loved ones and have to endure funerals. Half of these passings were a "surprise," while others were "expected."

Then again - as someone shared with me last night - we all know we're dying from the moment we learn what death is, from a very young age. It's not a surprise even though we don't know how to expect it.

Sorry for being candid about this.

All of this hit me today as I'm pondering what message will come out of me this weekend at Connection Church... shall I speak with urgency - which we are all rather tempted to sidestep - or shall I speak soothing words that provoke security.

Hmm... "security."

Which then leads me to ask questions about how I'm personally living...

which then leads me to ask questions about what really matters most.

Do you know what really matters most?

Is it life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness?

Is it a kid-centered home life where we let the loudest words and longest sighs of our kids determine what matters?

Is it a sense of security?

Helen Keller observed, "Security is mostly a superstition... Avoiding danger is no safer than in the long run than outright exposure. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing."

If eternity is real... if there really is a heaven...

if we really do believe that there's more to life than a sense of security...

than a sense of urgency would really be our only option.

We'd have to care about deeper things.
We'd have to rethink where we've stopped short.
We'd have to confront our true selves in the mirror.
We'd have to have an eye-to-eye with our real calling.

You know what...



never mind...



there's probably something else you can focus on instead.



Move along...





move along.






P.S. Or... J U M P

pioneers and settlers

One hurdle of trying to make your mark is once you feel you've made it you may let it mark you into retirement.

What if the point of life isn't arrival or competency?

What if the point of life is Life?

I'm reminded of the late Henri Nouwen who once asked, "Did becoming older bring me closer to Jesus?"

Once upon a time, we lived this way. 

Before skyscrapers and cities there was simply "the open range."

Before experts and consultants there were simply "immigrants."

What if this tension still exists - 

are you a settler or a pioneer?
  • Settlers see stopping points.
  • Pioneers see starting points.
  • Settlers see life as a possession.
  • Pioneers see life as an adventure.
  • Settlers see home being four borders wide.
  • Pioneers see home being a wagon train. 
  • Settlers see God as the Sheriff who maintains law and order.
  • Pioneers see God as the ultimate Scout who knows where new territory can be claimed.
We all want to self-actualize ourselves to be correct, assuming we know whichever one is "correct."

But do we truly risk and fail forward?

Do you try things that don't work? Do you innovate?

It's been said “Pioneers take the most arrows but also get the best land.”
"Terah took his son Abram, his grandson Lot son of Haran, and his daughter-in-law Sarai, the wife of his son Abram, and together they set out from Ur of the Chaldeans to go to Canaan. But when they came to Harran, they settled there." (Genesis 11:31)

The LORD had said to Abram, “Go from your country, your people and your father’s household to the land I will show you." So Abram went. (Genesis 12:1,4)

joy is built

Joy is not happiness... it's better.

Joy doesn't require getting what you want or having your say.

Joy isn't an absence of difficulty, pain or rejection.

Joy is not circumstantial.

Joy is built on unseen values like hope and tangible actions like faithfulness as a bedrock.

For anyone out there who is worn down by "loved ones" who do unloving things...

by "friends" who slide in and out of your life like strangers...

by "adults" who act childish and kids who insist they're grown up...

I'm with you. I'm praying for you (let me know how).

Let's find joy together. I'm finding it in fixing my eyes on Jesus, who...
"...for the joy set before him he endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God." (Hebrews 12:2)

what is your ring?

As you head into another round fo working hard, or are feeling burdened, I'm reminded of a quote from the Lord of the Rings.

"Frodo" has taken on the hard task of holding a ring that is full of darkness and dread as he and his companions journey to destroy it. By this point he is worn down and not sure how to proceed:
Frodo: "I wish the ring had never come to me. I wish none of this would have happened."

Gandalf: "So do all who live to see such times but that is not for us to decide. All we have to do is decide what to do with the time that is given to us."

What is your "ring?"

May you not be at the mercy of your fatigue.

May you not even at the mercy of your desire to make a difference.

May you instead live fully in the Story of God at work in your life, whether you are high-fiving Him, questioning Him or not yet aware of Him. If I can be a part of your journey as a companion or pray for you in any way, send me a note.
"Carry each other’s burdens, and in this way you will fulfill the law of Christ." (Galatians 6:20)

becoming naturally supernatural

Today is not yesterday,
nor is it tomorrow.

Life has many different chapters for us.

Several hard-to-process chapters in a row do not sum up the whole story,
nor do they signal it’s the end of your book.

I sense it's one of the reasons why the combination of December-into-January is such a unique window of times. A part of us is overwhelmed by the beauty, colorful lights and peace of Christmas... and then suddenly we're into a new year and not quite sure if we even understand the past one.

A new year offers many natural transition points, yet when we live according to them we may end up reacting than responding.

Following Jesus means we're able to live for something deeper and supernatural. The "natural" still has its place, but the"supernatural" is where real purpose offers an embrace.

The Bible is filled with life after life, story after story of situations that seemed a certain way for a season only to then experience a turnaround in the next.

It's all about becoming naturally supernatural.

Be aware of the chapter you're in, realizing that the Author is not yet done writing. His penmanship may be slower than yours, but His creativity and sense of the larger narrative is beyond compare.

In fact, try handing Him the pen you tend to want to take out of His hands.
And He who was seated on the throne said, “Behold, I am making all things new.” Also He said, “Write this down, for these words are trustworthy and true.” Rev. 21:5 

your anti-plan for the new year

Confession:

I don't enjoy structure for the sake of structure. 

Notice how I worded that. I didn't say "I don't enjoy structure."

That would be shortsighted, for a plan, method or framework can provide great sanity and purpose to everything we do.

 I could say that I prefer creative freedom more than I do repetitive routines.

Still, what I'm getting at is I don't like doing things just to do them, being bound by previous patterns, letting the calendar dictate my life or having others tell me the method by which I'm to live.

Yeah, I'm that guy.

Perhaps that's why I rejected my traditional church upbringing growing up as feeling too "dry" or "confining." Even when I finally seized my faith as a teenager, I was told by well-meaning mentors that to be a growing Christian I'd have to get up early every day for a "quiet time." After failing at that over and over, I concluded that I'd never be a growing Christian.

I don't enjoy structure for the sake of structure.

Thankfully, others came along and shared how the structure that helps some people grow spiritually doesn't always work for others. One person explained, "Don't let anyone impose their habits on you. The main goal is to nurture your relationship with God somehow. Have fun figuring that out."

So I have had fun figuring that out.

Discovering how to grow with God can be as creative as however you end up growing with God. 

While everyone is pushing for a definitive plan on how they will grow in this new year, I'd offer a 40 day journey that is full of more questions and prompts than a prescription that will work for everyone.

Don't want to do 40 days? No problem. Do 30. Or 20. Or 6. Pick a number.

Want to amp it up? Do this with others around you who are just like you, or reach out to a teenager and let this be an inter-generational thing.

Maybe share it a group-wide challenge?

However this serves you, I pray it serves you.

Behold - your anti-plan for the New Year:
  • Day 1: Look back - what are five things from last year that stand out for whatever reason? Write them down.
  • Day 2: Go back to yesterday's list. Ask God to show you something about it that you didn't catch when you first created it. Take your time with this.
  • Day 3: Pay better attention to every person you talk to today. Notice something about their appearance you never noticed before. Most people never as follow-up questions. Ask at least one. Look at that person more fully, paying attention to him/her versus what you're merely talking about. Let this deepen that friendship, even if only one step further.
  • Day 4: Consider the various ideas/goals you've heard others share about their physical fitness or eating plans. Has your reaction to this been more dismissive, carefree or motivated? Adopt one of their goals for the next 3 days.
  • Day 5: Start up a conversation about something that matters to you. Notice how easy it is for you to talk about it, even if others aren't into it. Let this inspire you in the next few days to move past the usual surface-level chit-chat to inspire or challenge others.
  • Day 6: Think about the chore you dislike the most. You're cringing already. Next time you do that chore, identify one simple way to make it fun - or perhaps sing or hum a favorite worship song the entire time you're doing it. Now, how do you feel?
  • Day 7: Review the past week. Create a "next-step" from anything in days 1 - 6, making sure you articulate when you will specifically take action on this.
  • Day 8: Evaluate your spiritual habits over the past month. Has time with Jesus been more about convenience or have you pushed past your own desires and comfort to really give God what's "right" and not what's "left?" Note any feelings or defensiveness that rises up in you on this, and create an action step.
  • Day 9: Review some recent news headlines or debates online. Think about the last time you took a genuine stand for something you believe in or listened to the perspective on something you disagreed with. Note how easy it is to either care too much or too little about certain topics. Chew on this for the next 24 hours, inviting God to speak into it.
  • Day 10: Reconsider yesterday's theme and apply both takeaways - let yourself fight for something important today (regardless of your fears), and let someone share what is important to him/her (regardless of your stance).
  • Day 11: Fight for a relationship that seems to be dissolving. Do this with gentleness and respect, and yet with boldness and unshakable commitment.
  • Day 12: Make a simple vision statement of where you think you're heading into this next year. If you get stuck, write down 3 to 5 of the greatest breakthroughs you imagine might happen in the months ahead. Share it with someone.
  • Day 13: Take a look at your calendar or habits, noting where you spend your time most days of the week. Wrestle with why "you" are "there" - how is your presence in those places more than accidental, but perhaps something intentional from God?
  • Day 14: Hone in on a goal from the past two weeks. Simplify it somehow so you gain traction by doing at least a good portion of it so that the entire magnitude of it doesn't overwhelm you.
  • Day 15: Shop for something that will build your personal book or music library. Do this today - don't put it off.
  • Day 16: Share some out-loud praises (perhaps with others in your home) of how God's specifically blessed you. Enjoy them and Him. Take it to the next level by considering how each of those blessings are meant to be shared with others and not merely for you.
  • Day 17: Tell a cashier that you're looking for a good candy bar and ask for a recommendation. Buy it, but then gift the cashier with that candy bar.
  • Day 18: Give yourself permission to be sad about something or someone. You can certainly move on afterward, but take time to grieve over things you tend to skip over.
  • Day 19: Ask a few people around you what is something they'd like to teach you how to do. Set up a time for this to happen.
  • Day 20: Come up with a way to rest appropriately over the next three days. See if you can get others to be on a similar plan.
  • Day 21: Own up to something from your past where you "stopped short" somehow, such as avoiding a situation or person by sneaking away or not giving your best somehow. Go back and make things right, even if it's merely to apologize.
  • Day 22: Get together with someone who's doing well in a skill or area of life you'd like to grow in. Ask questions about what they've learned along the way so you can apply it into your own life.
  • Day 23: Mark down any progress you feel you've made over the past few weeks, whether you do it privately or publicly. Do this every few weeks to recognize your growth.
  • Day 24: Make plans today to not use technology for anything but emergencies tomorrow.
  • Day 25: Take note of the good and bad "anchors" in your life: the people and habits that either help you grow into who God is growing you to be, or the fears and routines that keep you from taking risks that can propel you forward.
  • Day 26: Determine what might be a good book to read in the next month. Ask others for ideas in a particular genre you'd enjoy getting into.
  • Day 27: Eat a food that you normally wouldn't eat. Try to find a way to enjoy it.
  • Day 28: Create a mix of music for your next week, like your own personal soundtrack for whatever is ahead. Set up a way to listen to it.
  • Day 29: Pray a simple prayer for every person in your cell phone contact list. The only requirement? Don't generalize - personalize a prayer for each person by name.
  • Day 30: Give yourself and others some slack where you have been more tempted to give critique. Likewise, seek and offer some helpful accountability for yourself and others where you have been tempted to be hands off.
  • Day 31: Buy a gift card for a local ice cream parlor and give it to someone in your life who needs encouragement.
  • Day 32: Visit YouTube to search for and watch any archived message from Billy Graham that is in black-and-white. Fully focus on this.
  • Day 33: Reexamine your financial habits. What if you lived on 80% of what you make instead of 100% (or going into debt beyond what you make)? Aim for this - use the first 10% that you make to bless movements trying to serve the world, and bank the next 10% as savings. Manage and live on the rest.
  • Day 34: Do an exercise you will actually enjoy doing for at least 20 minutes.
  • Day 35: Tell someone today that God love them and is trying to get their attention. If they ask you how you know this, share a verse like Romans 1:20 or Job 33:14... or tell your own story of how He's spoken to you.
  • Day 36: Boldly invite someone to join you for church this weekend. Let the Lord guide you in this, but definitely take that step.
  • Day 37: Find a set of candy dispensers in a local store and place quarters into each mechanism's coin area so the next person who comes by can get something for free.
  • Day 38: Make sure everyone in your household and extended family knows you love them. Say it in a way that they will understand it.
  • Day 39: Make a meal for a busy neighbor.
  • Day 40: Challenge someone else to go through this list (and perhaps go through it again with him/her).
  • BONUS: Specifically invite other people to show you a blind spot or emotional trigger in your life that you may not be fully aware of.
  • BONUS: Invert something you're worried about by facing it through larger perspective found in Scripture or worship music.
See any use for this?  

Which one stands out to you?

What would you add or subtract?
If any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask God, who gives generously to all without reproach, and it will be given him.  (James 1:5)